Red Stringybark

Eucalyptus macrorhyncha

Red stringybark is a major pollen and honey tree of NSW and Victoria (Clemson, p.68). From two tests the pollen was found to be 23% to 24% crude protein and except for iso-leucine had a satisfactory amino-acid profile. (Table 10)

Red stringybark usually flowers in the autumn. It is advisable not to collect pollen from this source, as the bees need it all for overwintering.

It has been observed that bees foraging on red stringybark during a wet autumn may develop nosema disease. Nosema control methods of: dry apiary sites, keeping the spare supers off the hives, re-queening in midsummer, and refraining from hive manipulation or movements in the winter, are desirable if nosema disease is to be controlled.

Table 10: Red stringybark E. macrorhyncha

Amino-acid
Minimum % of Amino-Acid from De Groot (1953)
Southern Tablelands March 91
Inverell 

March 92

Threonine
3.0
3.37 3.23 
Valine
4.0
4.0  4.3 
Methionine
1.5
1.68 1.8 
Leucine
4.5
5.8  5.6 
Iso-leucine
4.0
3.2* 3.5*
Phenylalanine
2.5
3.5  3.3 
Lysine
3.0
5.6  5.1 
Histidine
1.5
1.9  2.0 
Arginine
3.0
5.9  5.5 
Tryptophan
1.0
- -
Crude protein   23.44% 23.2%

* Low level of this amino-acid

 

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